Golf bad boy Patrick Reed’s refrain was deny, deny, deny when he was caught improving the lie of his ball in Tiger Wood’s invitational event just prior to December’s Presidents Cup.

He was plagued with questions over his integrity and accused outright of being a cheat when television cameras caught him subtly removing sand with false strokes prior to chipping from the bunker at the event in Florida last year.

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But Reed eventually outran those accusations. Until now.

Golf commentator Peter Kotsis claims he’s seen Reed improve the lie of his ball on four separate occasions during his career.

Kotsis told the he’s seen the American do it, “up close and personal”.

And while he didn’t go so far as to blatantly label Reed as a cheat, Kotsis’s claims throw Reed’s character in fresh doubt.

“I’ve seen Patrick Reed improve his lie, up close and personal, four times now,” Kostis said.

“It’s the only time I ever shut [Gary] McCord up. He didn’t know what to say when I said, ‘Well, the lie I saw originally wouldn’t have allowed for this shot’.”

Patrick Reed denied he cheated when he was caught on camera improving the lie of a ball at an event in the Bahamas last year.

One incident in particular raised Kotsis’s eyebrows, from when Reed won the 2016 Barclays Cup.

“Because he put four or five clubs behind the ball, you know, kind of faking whether he was going to hit this shot or hit that shot and by the time he was done, he hit a freaking 3-wood out of there, which when I saw, it was a sand wedge layup originally,” Kotsis said.

And another, at Torrey Pines.

“He hit it over the green and did the same thing, put three or four clubs behind (the ball),” he said. “It was a really treacherous shot that nobody had gotten close all day long from over there. And by the time he was done, I could read ‘Callaway’ on the golf ball from my tower,” Kostis said.

Patrick reed adresses the ball after affecting the lie.

“I’m not even sure that he knows that he’s doing it sometimes. Maybe he does, I don’t know. I’m not going to assign intent. All I’m going to tell you is what I saw.”

We know Reed is all about intent; he claims there was no intent when he improved the lie of the ball at Woods’ Bahama soiree and therefore, he couldn’t be accused of cheating.

Watch the vision and judge for yourself. There can be no doubting Reed’s career comes with serious questions marks.